Vegetation management

Revegetation

A total of 91,000 indigenous species were planted across the urban coastal landscape of the Mackay Whitsunday Isaac region between 2013 and 2016. More than 11,500 were planted across 11 hectares (Far Beach, Haliday Bay, Bucasia Beach, Sandfly Creek, Clairview Beach, Smalleys Beach and Ball Bay) and 80,500 indigenous species were planted along and within three waterways (Twin Creek, Little McCreadys Creek and Lagoons Creek).

The focus of this revegetation is to improve and enhance the natural values of the area, ensure continued stabilisation of the dune systems and, in conjunction with weed control activities, improve opportunity for natural regeneration. In addition revegetation mitigates erosion, and protects the coastal buffer zone and riparian corridors through dune stabilisation and encouragement of natural regeneration whilst also providing additional habitat for native wildlife.

The focus of revegetation is to improve and enhance the natural values of the area, ensure continued stabilisation of the bed and banks and/or coastal dune systems, and, in conjunction with weed control and access management activities, improve opportunity for natural regeneration whilst also providing additional habitat for native wildlife.

Revegetation along Sandfly Creek increases native vegetation buffers providing greater resilience towards urban influences such as weed invasion, litter and stormwater runoff.

 

Revegetation of instream species within Little McCreadys Creek with the help of Mackay Regional Council, Conservation Volunteers Australia and the Green Army.

Weed control

Weeds change the natural diversity and balance of ecological communities. They have the ability to alter structure, species composition, fire frequency, and abundance of native communities, and consequently impact upon aquatic ecosystems and water quality. Weed control has occurred over eleven public sites across the urban coastal landscape of the Mackay Whitsunday Isaac region between 2013 and 2016.  Works were undertaken at Keeleys Road wetlands, Slade Point Reserve, Shoal Point to Bucasia Beach, Seaforth Reserve, Finlaysons Point, Ball Bay, Apsley Creek, Carmilla Reserve, Sandfly Creek Reserve, Sandringham Bay, Galbraith Creek, Twin Creek, Little McCreadys Creek, Lagoons Creek and Cape Palmerston as a means to improve water quality and increase native habitat connectivity in areas that have been heavily impacted by urban coastal development.

The focus on reserve areas for weed control included patches of critically endangered regional ecosystems (beach scrub (Regional Ecosystem 8.2.2), Melaleuca viridiflora woodlands (RE 8.3.3) and coastal grasslands (RE 7.4.1)) as well as other significant vegetation communities. Improving habitat connectivity is vital in such ecosystems such as beach scrub as it provides essential habitat for the listed northern quoll (EPBC Act, endangered), rusty monitor (NCA Act, of concern), mangrove mouse and coastal sheath tail bat (NCA Act, vulnerable).

Sites were chosen based upon their impact by urban/development activities, their capacity to be treated effectively, their current trend of condition, their ecological value, and their hydrological connectivity to the Great Barrier Reef. Significant weed species targeted included Class 2 pest species: hymenache, mother-of-millions, rat’s tail grasses, rubber vine, Class 3 pest species: broad-leaved pepper tree, Captain Cook tree, lantana, Singapore daisy and other problematic environmental weeds e.g. Guinea Grass.

Site inspection at Cape Palmerston to assess hymenachne regrowth post weed control investment and discuss QPWS ongoing maintenance requirements.

Photo monitoring points installed to assist vegetation condition assessment post work implementation.

Key Contact

Katrina Dent from Reef Catchments NRM in Mackay

Katrina Dent
P (07) 4968 4207
M 0438 115 086
E Katrina Dent